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Cambridge IELTS 9 Model Answer (Test 3, Task 1)

Test 3 Task 1

The two pie charts from the year 2000 detail historic population age in Yemen in Italy, and there are a further two charts providing a comparative projection for 2050. There are three age groups represented, with both countries displaying a decline in the proportion of younger populations and a converse increase in older populations.

First of all, in 2000, the majority of people in Yemen were aged 0-14, with 50.1%, compared with 46.3% 15-59 year olds and only 3.6% of people aged 60 plus. In Italy, however, child population is much lower, with only 14.3% of people aged between 0 and 14. This leaves the vast majority of people (61.6%) between 15 and 59, and a much higher proportion (24.1%) of people aged over 60.

Looking ahead to 2050, the Yemeni population is predicted to alter significantly in age, with 15-59 year olds expected to be in the majority, at 57.3%, compared with 37% 0-14 year olds and 5.7% over 60. In Italy, however, the percentage of both 15-59 year olds and 0-14 year olds will have fallen by 2050, with projected figures of 46.2% and 11.5% respectively. This then means that proportion of over 60s will have increased dramatically, almost doubling to 42.3%, which represents by far the largest predicted change.

(179 words)

In this model answer, I have chosen to divide my paragraphs in to 2000 / 2050. However, you could also choose to divide them in to Italy / Yemen. If you do this, then you can use language to describe change over time in each paragraph (increase / decrease). I have also chosen to clearly represent every figure as a percentage, but you could use roughly / approximately etc. and talk about double / half.

 

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Cambridge IELTS 9 Model Answer (Test 3, Task 2)

Some people believe that unpaid community service should be a compulsory part of high school programmes (for example working for a charity, improving the neighbourhood or teaching sports to younger children).

To what extent do you agree or disagree?

It has long been a priority of educational authorities to widen and improve the overall experience of pupils. To that end, a recent suggestion has been made that children should be involved in community service tasks such as charity work or neighbourhood improvement as a mandatory part of their schooling. While this could be seen as a waste of school time, there are clear benefits which can not be ignored.

It could be argued that children today do not spend enough time learning, and that compulsory extra-curricular activities would only further decrease study time. Although community work is important, homework and self-study time would have a more direct benefit on the education and exam results of a child, in turn providing the opportunity for academic advancement to university. Alternatively, this time could be spent on physical exercise and team sports as a way of combatting the increase in free time activities which promote laziness, such as computer-based gaming or chatting. Moreover, neighbourhood tasks should be being undertaken by council employees, rather than being forced upon the younger members of a community. These issues could therefore form a valid argument against the incorporation of such activities in to school curricula.

However, the importance of children learning social values through experiencing and contributing to community spirit should not be ignored. Charity work would teach them to support one another in later life, and any activity related to improvement would teach them the importance of contribution to one’s own local area, thereby simultaneously discouraging anti-social or criminal behaviour. Furthermore, becoming involved in mentoring younger children would arguably promote a stronger sense of team spirit than merely engaging in competitive sport with age-group segregation. Therefore, it would be an excellent idea to consider some kind of monitored social activity to encourage personal growth in teenage pupils.

In conclusion, while it is understandable that the idea of community service may cause concern due to a perceived lack of educating, I strongly believe that these activities would teach children at high school level to be more rounded as individuals, as well as better able to positively contribute to society in later life.