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Cambridge IELTS 9 Model Answer (Test 4, Task 1)

Test 4 Task 1

The line graph outlines energy consumption in the USA from 1980 to the present day, with further projections up until 2030. Use is recorded in quadrillion units and is divided in to six categories, almost all of which display a general increase over time.

For the entirety of the period covered, petrol and oil usage is the highest. In 1980, 35 quadrillion units were used, and this dipped a little initially before rising steadily to a projected peak of 50 quadrillion units by 2030. This rate of increase is matched by that of coal, whose usage climbs from around 16 quadrillion units to just over 30 quadrillion units over the same period of time. This means that, by 2030, it is expected to be the second-most used fuel, whereas in 1980 natural gas usage was higher, at 20 quadrillion units. However, usage of this fuel is expected to remain at 25 quadrillion units from 2015 until 2030.

At the other end of the spectrum, nuclear fuel and solar / wind fuel usage is not predicted to change drastically, with increases from 3 to 8 and 3 to 6 quadrillion units respectively. In slight contrast, usage of hydropower, which was also 3 quadrillion units in 1980, dropped very slightly to approximately 2.5 quadrillion units in 2011, and it is not expected that this level of usage will change in the future.

(205 words)

A few points.

  1. In the introduction, explain what the X and Y axes display – time and quadrillion units.
  2. If there are any trends that are the same, make reference to that – coal / petrol and oil increase at a very similar rate.
  3. Similarly, highlight contrasts. Coal and Natural Gas change places between 1980 and 2030.
  4. Decide how to group your information. Here, I’ve decided to group three high and three low together in paragraphs.
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Cambridge IELTS 9 Model Answer (Test 3, Task 1)

Test 3 Task 1

The two pie charts from the year 2000 detail historic population age in Yemen in Italy, and there are a further two charts providing a comparative projection for 2050. There are three age groups represented, with both countries displaying a decline in the proportion of younger populations and a converse increase in older populations.

First of all, in 2000, the majority of people in Yemen were aged 0-14, with 50.1%, compared with 46.3% 15-59 year olds and only 3.6% of people aged 60 plus. In Italy, however, child population is much lower, with only 14.3% of people aged between 0 and 14. This leaves the vast majority of people (61.6%) between 15 and 59, and a much higher proportion (24.1%) of people aged over 60.

Looking ahead to 2050, the Yemeni population is predicted to alter significantly in age, with 15-59 year olds expected to be in the majority, at 57.3%, compared with 37% 0-14 year olds and 5.7% over 60. In Italy, however, the percentage of both 15-59 year olds and 0-14 year olds will have fallen by 2050, with projected figures of 46.2% and 11.5% respectively. This then means that proportion of over 60s will have increased dramatically, almost doubling to 42.3%, which represents by far the largest predicted change.

(179 words)

In this model answer, I have chosen to divide my paragraphs in to 2000 / 2050. However, you could also choose to divide them in to Italy / Yemen. If you do this, then you can use language to describe change over time in each paragraph (increase / decrease). I have also chosen to clearly represent every figure as a percentage, but you could use roughly / approximately etc. and talk about double / half.

 

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Prepositions in IELTS Task 1 Writing

OK, let’s take a look at a few prepositions, and a really easy way to remember how to use them.

  1. to / from

In task 1, you will use “to” if you are talking about change. So, if something goes up or down, we use “to”. Look at the example:

The number of people rose to 800,000 in 2011.

So, we use “to” for changes, and we use it to describe the second number – the number at the end of the increase / decrease.

We also use “to” with “from” – like from 400,000 to 800,000 – again, we are talking about the end number. If we want to talk about the start number, we use “from”.

2. by

We use “by” similarly to “to”, so when we talk about change. This time, however, we are thinking about the difference between point A and point B. Here’s another example:

Number of people, 2001 = 55

Number of people, 2005 = 60

The number of people rose by 5 from 2001 to 2005.

So, we also use “by” for changes as well, but to talk about difference.

3. at

We use “at” to talk about numbers that haven’t changed over time. Look at this example:

The number remained steady at 25 for about five years.

So, “at” is used in the opposite situation to “to”.

4. with

We use “with” when we just want to talk about one number, at one time, with no changes. Here’s an example:

The highest number was in the 16-25 age group, with 500,000.

Conclusion

So, here’s the simple way to remember:

to – change, second number
from – change, first number
by – change, difference between first and last

at – no change over time

with – one number, no movement in time

Good luck!

 

Simon